I love training driven, enthusiastic athletes. If you’re looking for a Strength Coach to help your athlete become stronger, both physically and mentally, then you’ve come to the right place.

I tend to attract high school athletes. Word of mouth has been the main reason for the program’s growth as I do very little if any on or offline marketing. In any event, the high school years are important and as you parents know, these years will be over in a flash. It is imperative to start training with an experienced Strength Coach as early as possible – 9th grade is ideal.

IS IT A GOOD FIT?

With the internet and social media, there’s a lot of noise. It’s easy to get caught up in the latest fads and training crazes, switching each month to something new. This is a guaranteed recipe for failure.

In my world, the strength world, nothing takes the place of the basics. Bench Press, Military Presses, Pull Ups, Squats and Deadlifts. I’ve been doing these core lifts since 1985 and I’m still training the same way.  I still love competing each year in Austin’s Fittest or True Athlete Games. To put it bluntly, I believe a good coach must walk the walk to earn the athletes respect. I would never ask my athletes to do something that I wouldn’t do with them.

Before hiring me, meet with me, talk with my clients, watch a workout and ask a ton of questions. If we agree that my training is a good fit, allow me to do my job. A Baseball Coach is not a Strength Coach, a Football Coach is not a Strength Coach. Just as I am not a Baseball Coach or a Football Coach.

“Scott’s training is unique because he trains the whole athlete. He trains the physical side by using proven, current training techniques customized to the athlete and the athlete’s goals. He monitors the food intake and sleep patterns. He measures success by setting goals with the athlete, bench marking the journey then celebrating attained goals.
He trains the intellectual and emotional side of the athlete by referencing many books he has read as well as personal experiences that are positively motivating. He speaks passionately about the mental game of focus. He coaches the athlete on how focus can be a game changer.
As a trainer, Scott’s differentiator is that he trains along side the athlete. He doesn’t ask what he is not willing or able to give.
He has worked with my son for about 6 months now. I have witnessed how his training methods are effective both in the gym and in life. My son has become laser focused on goals in and out of sport. He has learned the fine art of taking time to celebrate victories as well as recalibration when necessary. I am truly thankful for Scott’s influence in my son’s life. He is learning skills that will help him be successful in life.”
– R.N./Cedar Park, Texas

Focus on the results that your athlete gets. Don’t be surprised if your athlete becomes the strongest, most athletic individual in his or her school. Don’t be surprised if his or her grades begin to improve, a budding leader emerges and colleges start offering athletic scholarships. It’s happened before. And it’s happening today. Want your athlete to get stronger? He/she will. Want them to become more resistant to injuries? They will. Want them to learn to use their mind to expect more of themselves and their teammates? They will.

Workouts should be goal oriented.
Workouts should be organized.
Safety always comes first.

Sometimes, especially in the beginning, they will have to walk alone. They may want to stop, quit, give up. That’s why they HAVE to be certain of how badly they want to achieve before they start. To reach the top, they have to be willing to do what others won’t. That’s where the Strength Coach who works out with the athlete comes into play. It’s a special relationship, it’s unusual and it’s powerful.  Block out the noise, show up with a good attitude, be consistent, and the reason that you hired me – to get stronger – will occur. The high school years go fast so it’s important to establish goals and then make each day count.

brett-favre-strength-training
Brett Favre, NFL Hall Of Fame

 

Brett Favre did not lift weights in college. “I was so foolish not to have lifted in college” Brett stated. “I really screwed up. I lifted in high school but stupidly I quit when in college. Now, with Green Bay, lifting and conditioning has become a part of my life. I workout 5-6 times a week.  I feel you get great health and mental benefits from working out. Plus, the injury prevention factor. I can’t run very fast and I’m not that big so my extra strength that I’ve built up gives me the ability to break a tackle once in awhile, scramble and, if I need to, throw off balance.  I credit my strength coaches for motivating and instructing me.”

Please contact me if you have any questions
Thanks, Scott